strip


strip
strip1 [strıp] v past tense and past participle stripped present participle stripping
▬▬▬▬▬▬▬
1¦(take off clothes)¦
2¦(remove)¦
3¦(engines/equipment)¦
4¦(building/ship etc)¦
5¦(damage)¦
Phrasal verbs
 strip something<=>away
 strip somebody of something
▬▬▬▬▬▬▬
[: Old English; Origin: -strypan]
1.) ¦(TAKE OFF CLOTHES)¦
a) [I and T] also strip off
to take off your clothes or take off someone else's clothes
→↑undress
Jack stripped and jumped into the shower.
The prisoner was stripped and beaten.
strip off sth
He stripped off his sweater and threw it onto the couch.
Eric stood in the hot sun, stripped to the waist (=not wearing any clothes on the top half of his body) .
Terry stripped down to her bra and pants (=removed all her clothes except her bra and pants) and tried on the dress.
The boys stripped naked and jumped in the pond.
b)
to take off your clothes in a sexually exciting way as entertainment for someone else
2.) ¦(REMOVE)¦ [T]
to remove something that is covering the surface of something else
Strip the beds and wash the sheets.
strip sth off/from sth
We need to strip the wallpaper off the walls first.
strip sth of sth
tall windows stripped of curtains
3.) ¦(ENGINES/EQUIPMENT)¦ [i]also strip down [T]
to separate an engine or piece of equipment into pieces in order to clean or repair it
4.) ¦(BUILDING/SHIP ETC)¦ [T]
to remove everything that is inside a building, all the equipment from a car etc so that it is completely empty
The apartment had been stripped bare .
5.) ¦(DAMAGE)¦ [T]
to damage or break the ↑gears of something or the ↑thread (=raised line) on a screw so that it does not work correctly any more
strip away [strip sth<=>away] phr v
to remove something, especially something that hides or protects someone or something
His book aims to strip away the lies and show the world as it really is.
strip of [strip sb of sth] phr v
to take away something important from someone as a punishment, for example their title, property, or power
Captain Evans was found guilty and stripped of his rank.
strip 2
strip2 W3 n
[Date: 1400-1500; Origin: Perhaps from Middle Low German strippe 'strap']
1.) a long narrow piece of paper, cloth etc
a strip of paper
2.) a long narrow area of land
A strip of sand between the cliffs and the sea.
3.) do a strip
to take your clothes off, especially in a sexually exciting way as a form of entertainment
4.) AmE a road with a lot of shops, restaurants etc along it
the Las Vegas strip
5.) [usually singular] BrE
the clothes worn by a sports team
Liverpool's famous red strip
6.) a ↑strip cartoon
tear sb off a strip attear2 (8)

Dictionary of contemporary English. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • strip# — strip vb Strip, divest, denude, bare, dismantle can mean to deprive a person or thing of what clothes, furnishes, or invests him or it. Strip stresses a pulling or tearing off rather than a laying bare, though the latter implication is frequent;… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Strip — Strip, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Stripped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Stripping}.] [OE. stripen, strepen, AS. str?pan in bestr?pan to plunder; akin to D. stroopen, MHG. stroufen, G. streifen.] 1. To deprive; to bereave; to make destitute; to plunder;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Strip — Студийный альбом Адам Ант Дата выпуска ноябрь 1983 Записан …   Википедия

  • strip — strip1 [strip] vt. stripped, stripping [ME strepen < OE stripan, akin to streifen, to strip off < IE * streub < base * ster , to streak, stroke > STRIKE] 1. to remove (the clothing or covering) of or from (a person); make naked;… …   English World dictionary

  • Strip me? — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda strip me? Álbum de Anna Tsuchiya Publicación 2 de agosto, 2006 Grabación 2005, 2006 …   Wikipedia Español

  • strip — ‘narrow piece’ [15] and strip ‘remove covering’ [13] are distinct words. The former was perhaps borrowed from Middle Low German strippe ‘strap’, and may be related to English stripe [17], an acquisition from Middle Dutch strīfe. A stripling [13]… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • strip — ‘narrow piece’ [15] and strip ‘remove covering’ [13] are distinct words. The former was perhaps borrowed from Middle Low German strippe ‘strap’, and may be related to English stripe [17], an acquisition from Middle Dutch strīfe. A stripling [13]… …   Word origins

  • Strip — Strip, n. 1. A narrow piece, or one comparatively long; as, a strip of cloth; a strip of land. [1913 Webster] 2. (Mining) A trough for washing ore. [1913 Webster] 3. (Gunnery) The issuing of a projectile from a rifled gun without acquiring the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Strip Me? — Álbum de Anna Tsuchiya Publicación 2 de agosto, 2006 Grabación 2005, 2006 Género(s) J Rock, Punk …   Wikipedia Español

  • Strip Me? — Album par Anna Tsuchiya Sortie 2 août 2006 24 octobre 2006 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Strip — Strip, v. i. 1. To take off, or become divested of, clothes or covering; to undress. [1913 Webster] 2. (Mach.) To fail in the thread; to lose the thread, as a bolt, screw, or nut. See {Strip}, v. t., 8. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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